3 – Develop

Product Development Methodologies | Cloud City Development

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By Chuck Fitzpatrick
Agile Evangelist and Project Manager
Cloud City Development
@cfitzpat

StartUP Product‘s insight:

Excerpted from Chuck’s posting

 

Question: What’s the best methodology?
Answer: It depends.

In the early decades of software development, the emerging industry followed the models of engineering that had served the world well for all of modern history. Collectively, those methodologies can be described as “anticipatory.”

As time passed, the software development community found that many large projects failed because those assumptions proved to be largely incorrect. Product consumers have no idea what they want—they change their minds constantly, so our ability to predict what they want is . . .impossible.

There have been many attempts to address the underlying issues that cause failures in product development, whether they are software or non-software products. The attempts that are proving to be successful turn those earlier assumptions on their heads:

1. Make implementation a part of requirements discovery

2. Incrementally grow the system

3. Flatten the cost curve: If you can keep the cost curve flat, then not knowing what to build today is less of a concern, since the cost to build it later, when you know more, is the same.

I am fascinated with the many ways that humans have created to make the difficult bits and pieces of creating new products move forward in the best possible manner.

See on blog.cloudcitydevelopment.com

How To Make Better Product Decisions

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The remarkable thing about your mental life is that you are rarely ever stumped.”  – Daniel Kahneman It’s Thursday morning. You settle into your office chair, you crack open your laptop, you take a…

StartUP Product‘s insight:

Great posting from Product Talk by Teresa Torres!

Teresa discussed this in person over great beer and refreshments on Wednesday, August 14, 2013 Startup Product Talks meetup at Atlassian http://bit.ly/1e8Yr72

 
[View the story “#StartupProduct: How To Make Better Product Decisions” on Storify]

Teresa is also speaking on Friday, October 11, 2013 Startup Product Summit SF2! Register today for best price! http://bit.ly/11J59AG

Startup Product Summit SF2 is one event during Product Weekend San Francisco, starting with trainings on Thursday, Summit on Friday followed by AfterParty, then Product Camp San Francisco on Saturday all at historic Broadway Studios! Follow blog to stay updated at http://startupproduct.com

See on teresatorres.com

Lean startups should “pivot” on product and strategy, but not on passion – Chris Hoogewerff

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Some entrepreneurs and builders are driven by the prosp […]

StartUP Product‘s insight:

We’ve learned a lot about creating great products from the Lean movement, not surprisingly in the ‘measure’ and ‘learn’ steps of the ‘Build, measure, learn’ cycle.  In this thoughtful article, Chris Hoogewerff proposes a 4th step.  He argues convincingly that it’s vital to maintain passion even after major pivots, and when we pivot to something that departs too much from that “thing” that compelled us to create our startup, we may be in trouble.  To paraphrase, the litmus test could come in the form of a ‘Visualize’ step where we ask ourselves, ‘Do I love this new product and will I be fanatical about serving the people that will use it?’

Join us October 11, 2013 for Startup Product Summit SF2 to connect with lots of others that are passionate about product.  Register: http://bit.ly/11jHipK

See on chrishoog.com

Responsive HTML Templates

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There has been alot of movement in “responsive HTML” over the last 2 years.  Basically, responsive means that the page will morph as the screen gets smaller.  It changes to use the available space …

StartUP Product‘s insight:

Basically, responsive means that the page will morph as the screen gets smaller.

I was trying to design a page editor application that gave a non-programmer power to make responsive pages using as much WYSIWYG UI as possible.

Responsive HTML Templates work best when your layout/content scope is going to remain static.  It sucks when your layout is changing all the time, like a public website or even an application of moderate-high complexity.

– how will you know the good posts from the bad if they are all good.

Glen Lipka, is VP of UX at Marketo. He will be speaking at the Startup Product Summit SF2 – register before June 24 for $400 off! http://bit.ly/11J59AG

See on commadot.com

The Best Product Management Tools for Developers – ProfitBricks Blog

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StartUP Product‘s insight:

Article reviews results of Forrester 2012 Report on Application LifeCycle Management Tools

“nine of the most common software platforms for product development and application lifecycle management against 116 criteria”

However, the title says “Best Product Management Tools for Developers

Sorely missing from this list are tools built by developers and product managers specifically to solve their pains not being resolved elsewhere AND conducive to running lean:

https://sprint.ly/ Don’t ask how projects are going. Watch how they’re going in real-time.

Prodpad.com Product Management Software for your Entire Team

https://rizzoma.com/ Group collaboration – manage communications, roadmap, easily view as mindmap, manage levels of interactions & views, automates email communications and team management (delivers on the promise of Google Wave for distributed team collaboration)

GetMilemarker.com – capture ideas, prioritize features, easily portray roadmap & view status to completion with dates/times

Kanban2go.com – visual online task management software

See on blog.profitbricks.com

#ProdMgmtTalk on Human Centered Design with Chris Pacione, CEO, LUMA Insititute

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Chris Pacione, CEO, LUMA Institute, Will Discuss The Practice Of Human-Centered Design For Preparing People, Teams, And Entire Organizations To Increase Innovation

Human Centered Design: Chris Pacione, CEO, LUMA Insititute 04/08 by ProdMgmtTalk | Blog Talk Radio

Human Centered Design: Chris Pacione, CEO, LUMA Insititute 04/08 by ProdMgmtTalk | Blog Talk Radio

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NOTE: DAY & TIME!
Monday, April 8, 2013 at the simultaneous times of 10:00 AM Pacific Time, 11:00 AM MST Denver, 12:00 Noon CST Chicago, and 1:00 PM EST Boston.
—————————————————————————————-
Listen! http://bit.ly/17a6dNl
Background resources: http://bit.ly/Z4rKQb
Mark your calendar with the correct time: http://bit.ly/YXNgaa
Follow for reminders: http://bit.ly/nbw9Yr
Curated Content: http://bit.ly/TV4Dsp
Participate! http://bit.ly/eC3D09
Survey: http://bit.ly/XejfWi
————————————

The Global Product Management Talk features an expert guest discussing pre-posted questions with Cindy F. Solomon, co-hosts, and Twitter participants broadcast live over BlogTalkRadio. The transcript of Tweets and podcast are available following the event for on-demand consumption on the web, iTunes, Google Play and mobile devices. More information available athttp://www.prodmgmttalk.com Get reminders and listen live by followinghttp://www.blogtalkradio.com/prodmgmttalk

————————————-
What is #ProdMgmtTalk? http://bit.ly/AlLEbN
Join Global Product Management Talk! http://linkd.in/jRmwRx
Never participated in a twitter chat? FAQs http://t.co/Qr2s1o0O
Learn How to participate in Socratic Twitter Talk via Global Prod Mgmt Talkhttp://t.co/nV2DZflo

Learn about Tweeting Best Practices and Twitter Talk FAQshttp://t.co/8WzU7LSf
Want to reach target audience of Product Professionals? Sponsor Global Product Management Talk! http://bit.ly/gF0Tt3

Join us at http://tweetchat.com/room/prodmgmttalk automatically appends hashtag
Our format: we post questions Q1, Q2, Q3 Please answer using A1, A2, A3

Questions for Discussion:
PreQ: Please introduce yourself, where you are tweeting from & your involvement with #prodmgmt #prodmgmttalk

Q1 Are you someone who strives to maintain the status quo? Or are you someone who wants to make things better?

Q2 Do you consider yourself an innovator? Why? Why now?

Q3 If so, do you consider yourself innovative? You know, fluent in it. Do you consider yourself good at it, something you have enough expertise in, in order to apply this expertise consistently and successfully most of the time?

Q4 How many people would say they know what it even means to be competent in innovation? If someone, or some organization on the whole is good at innovation, what *exactly* are they good at?

Q5 Do you consider yourself a designer? Why? Why not?

About Chris Pacione

As a Co-Founder and CEO of LUMA Institute, Chris leads a highly skilled, multidisciplinary team of practitioners located around the world who are passionate about preparing organizations to be more innovative. He is a frequent speaker on the topic of design and innovation in the US, Europe and Asia and is co-author of the book, “Innovating for People”.

Prior to LUMA Institute, Chris co-founded BodyMedia, Inc., one of the early pioneers in wearable health monitoring, and headed up experience design and customer marketing.

Chris’s work has been cited in numerous national and international publications including Business Week, the NY times, Wired Magazine and Fast Company as well as several popular books about design and innovation including “In the Bubble: Designing in a Complex World” and “The Design of Things to Come: How Ordinary People Create Extraordinary Products.”

He holds several IDEA Gold Medal Awards sponsored by Business Week and the Industrial Designers Society of America and has been awarded numerous US and EU patents for his work.
Contact
Pittsburgh, PA
Site: http://www.luma-institute.com
Email: chris at luma-institute.com

Key Takeaways from the Marketing and Getting Traction Panel at Startup Product Summit SF

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By Michelle Sun

Here are the notes for the Marketing and Getting Traction Section at Startup Product Summit SF. Omissions and errors are mine (please let me know if you find any, thank you!), credit for the wisdom is entirely the speakers’.

Eric Kim
Eric Kim

“Your Product is your Marketing, and You are Your Product” – Eric Kim, Co-Founder & CEO, Twylah

Essential foundations of a personal brand:

    • Thought leadership by expressing yourself around themes you want to be recognized for.
    • Story-telling: Personal brand comes from not just conveying facts but weaving a story.
    • Content-marketing: Convey something of value to your audience. Your content should be educating, inspiring or calling to action.  Identify a segment of audience and project content that’s valuable to that segment.
  • How to cultivate personal brand:
    • Engagement.  Have a conversation around the topics you are interested in.
    • Community.  Allow and encourage interaction and discussion amongst your audience.
    • Custserv: Show the love by being responsive to customer / audience feedback.  Quoted Buffer as a good example of incorporating customer happiness as a core of the product.
  • How to leverage the brand to help or make a business
    • Ask: call to action.
    • Upsell: selling premium content or related services.
    • Downsell: lower barrier by decreasing the length of commitment.
  • Building a brand is about developing relationship. By consistently laying the foundations, it enables the individual to deliver authority, credibility and familiarity
  • How to get content to right people when first starting out.
    • Content/audience fit.  Publish content and people have something to respond to
    • #hashtag on Twitter is a great way to reach out to audience, outside of the followers count
    • Brainstorm by asking questions. What are the three things that define you, that you’re passionate about, that you can create or curate
  • Trustworthiness springs from familiarity and human touch.  An individual’s brand identity is something that builds up and follows him over the course of his life and career.

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Mariya Yao
Mariya Yao

“Make Your Numbers Go Up: How to Optimize for Conversion & Retention on Mobile” – Mariya Yao, Founder & Product Strategist, Xanadu Mobile

  • When thinking about optimizing metrics in a product, there is a dichotomy of:
    • Local maxima: am I building the product right?  What should we A/B test?  What platform? How to improve retention?
    • Global maxima: am I building the right product?  Am I in right market?
  • Two strategies in evaluating a global maxima:
    • Benchmarking.  Top down approach that starts with the overall industry landscape.
      • How do mobile users spend their time? What are the fastest growing app categories? What apps have most loyal users? Why do certain apps retain well and how do I use that into my app? What are the most profitable apps segment? Where in the world are smartphones adopted the fastest?
      • What are the trends/opportunities?
      • Where are the danger zones? Why have companies failed there?
      • What can people do on mobile they weren’t able to do before?
      • Why are people loyal to these apps?
    • Behavior. Bottom up approach.
      • Apps are either creating or replacing behavior: A case study on Foursquare and Instagram.
      • Foursquare was creating a new behavior (check-in) that has no prior parallel, which explains the pivot from check-in in 2009 to explore in 2012. When creating a behavior, focus on delivering value or providing strong incentives such as saved money, time or exclusive/perks.
      • In pre-Instagram era, 76% of people were using their phones to take photos. Mariya examined a detailed flow of taking a photo and sharing on facebook, and contrasted it with how Instagram made the process significantly shorter and easier.
  • Are you solving a problem or a nuisance?  A common pitfall in startups is that they are building a company that is solving a nuisance instead of a problem.  When solving a nuisance, in order for such product to succeed, the product needs to be better than the existing solution by magnitudes (eg, everyone complains about Craigslist but in the end tolerates it). A good way to distinguish between problem and nuisance is: Have they [the users] paid for a solution before, or spent a lot of time finding a solution or making a solution themselves]?

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Guillaume Decugis
Guillaume Decugis

“Reach Escape Velocity through Lean Content Marketing” – Guillaume Decugis, Co-Founder & CEO, Scoop.it

  • ”Content marketing is practice of creating content relevant to your brand to gain greater visibility in search results and in social channels” – JD Lasica, Social Meida Biz
  • 4 strategies that lean content has worked for Scoop.it
    • Leverage SlideShare’s natural distribution to share your vision: Despite having a relatively small followers count, Scoop.it’s content on SlideShare has gathered significant views.
    • Guest post to get distribution for your idea. Identify blogs in your niche and segment which are interesting.
    • Answer Quora questions that related to your field.  Answering on Quora is like blogging for a known, existing and savvy audience, who already have questions.
    • Content curation.  Starting point, leverage what you already do (read), express your expertise & develop it, helps you identify original topics for content creation.  If you don’t know what content to create, start with curation.

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Leo Wilder
Leo Wilder

“Monetization: How Buffer went from Idea to Revenue in 7 weeks & 50K users in 8 months” 

  • Leo shared three key stories/lessons from building Buffer so far.
    • Validate first, code later.  The story of Joel, cofounder of Buffer, validated his idea of Buffer before writing a line of backend code, by putting up a landing page and testing clicks on sign up and pricing.
    • Working with percentages.  When doing business development and getting press, Leo suggests anchoring expectations with percentages (out of 10 emails, expect ~20-40% response rate), to avoid frustration and improve resilience in mindset.  He talked about the mindset helped him write 350 guest posts in the first 9 months of running Buffer, and getting press every 3 weeks.
    • Experiment with pricing.  He encourages the audience to test frequently pricing plans and points what works for the product, while always be great to existing users.

    buffer

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Jameson Detweiler

Jameson Detweiler

“Launching and Getting Users” – Jameson Detweiler, Co-Founder & CEO, LaunchRock

  • Jameson told his journey of first 42 days of running LaunchRock, from StartupWeekend to launching on Day 5, getting on TechCrunch on Day 7 and campaign at SXSW on Day 42.
  • How to effectively launch and get users:
    • Be sexy [ beautifully designed product ], flirtatious [ LaunchRock’s traction is in part thanks to the wait between users’ signing up and the product is ready ], exotic [ build something new and unique ].
    • Be targeted and specific in the value proposition; that makes it easy for people to talk about your brand.
    • Be nice to press: do the related research, and make it easy for the press to write about you.
    • Launch and listen to customer feedback.
    • Be authentic when telling your story.

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Notes on other panels:

About The Author

Michelle Sun is a product enthusiast and python developer.  She worked at Bump Technologies as a Product Data Analyst and graduated from the inaugural class of Hackbright Academy. Prior to Hackbright, she founded a mobile loyalty startup. She began her career as an investment research analyst. When she is not busy coding away these days, she enjoys blogging, practicing vinyasa yoga and reading about behavioral psychology. Follow her on Twitter at @michellelsun and her blog.