Engineering

This I Believe

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Posted by Marty Cagan on July 31, 2013 at http://svpg.com/this-i-believe/

 

StartUP Product‘s insight:

Quoting Marty Cagan’s points:

  • rapid and constant evolution in technology provides hope that we can continue to solve important problems for people and our world.
  • passionate leaders…are the people that make an impact in the world, and I want to help them achieve their vision.
  • to be effective in helping people and organizations improve, you need to be honest.
  • Successful teams are comprised of these sorts of people (smart, willing to work hard, passionate about what they do, and sincere about wanting to improve), and the world needs as many as we can find.
  • the accomplishments I feel proudest of today are not the actual products I helped create, but rather, the many people across our industry I have helped to hire and develop…I love seeing them creating exceptional products, and leading great organizations of their own
  • I believe in continuous improvement. I try very hard not to get too attached to, or to be too closely associated with, any particular school of thought or technique

See on svpg.com

How To Make Better Product Decisions

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The remarkable thing about your mental life is that you are rarely ever stumped.”  – Daniel Kahneman It’s Thursday morning. You settle into your office chair, you crack open your laptop, you take a…

StartUP Product‘s insight:

Great posting from Product Talk by Teresa Torres!

Teresa discussed this in person over great beer and refreshments on Wednesday, August 14, 2013 Startup Product Talks meetup at Atlassian http://bit.ly/1e8Yr72

 
[View the story “#StartupProduct: How To Make Better Product Decisions” on Storify]

Teresa is also speaking on Friday, October 11, 2013 Startup Product Summit SF2! Register today for best price! http://bit.ly/11J59AG

Startup Product Summit SF2 is one event during Product Weekend San Francisco, starting with trainings on Thursday, Summit on Friday followed by AfterParty, then Product Camp San Francisco on Saturday all at historic Broadway Studios! Follow blog to stay updated at http://startupproduct.com

See on teresatorres.com

Engineering Where the Most Opportunity Exists > ENGINEERING.com

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This blog on “Design Software” is not going to be about a review of what exists, but rather in what I feel is missing in the current offerings from so…

StartUP Product‘s insight:

– The best chance for a product to be developed to strike the balance between obtaining the highest performance, lowest cost, and any other requirement exist at the earliest stages of development.
– The ability to consider multiple concepts and measure/simulate performance against requirements early, i.e. before any detail design activities begin, maximizes the opportunity for a product to be successful.
– In other words: the best concept yields the best product.

So if the best potential for success is in the concept development phase, where are the conceptual engineering software tools?

See on www.engineering.com

The Software Revolution Behind LinkedIn’s Gushing Profits | Wired Business | Wired.com

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LinkedIn took a huge risk pausing all development for two months as it switched to a turbocharged new system known as “continuous deployment.” The gamble paid off big: LinkedIn now releases new web and app features twice per day, compared with…

 

StartUP Product‘s insight:

The move to continuous deployment was about solving concrete problems rather than spreading a doctrine.

  • Shifting from feature-branch-based development to the new continuous deployment system required halting all development for two months as LinkedIn trained staff, migrated old code, and built out the automated tools it needed to make the new system work.

“It was a pretty big risk the business took,” says Scott, “to look at its engineering team and say, ‘we’re going to completely change the way we do software… and somewhere in the middle of this two-month process you’re going to run across a bridge and burn it behind you.”

  • Under continuous deployment, a developer writes new code in tidy, discrete little chunks and quickly checks each chunk into the main line of software shared amongst all LinkedIn developers, a line known as “trunk” within the software version control systems standard in the tech industry.
  • Newly-added code is subjected to an elaborate series of automated tests designed to weed out any bugs.
  • Once the code passes the tests it is merged into trunk and cataloged in a system that shows managers what features are ready to go live on the site or in new versions of LinkedIn’s apps.

See on www.wired.com